PHOTOS BY Brooke Wheeler

How to Make Coconut Flour


 2022-11-22

People may use coconut flour in place of traditional grain-based flour for many reasons. For one, coconut flour is grain-free, gluten-free, low-carb, high in fiber (which makes it filling), a good source of protein, and naturally sweet.

With all of those qualities, it’s a wonder we don’t make everything with coconut flour, right? Well, one drawback to coconut flour is that it’s pretty expensive. The good news is that coconut flour is super easy to make yourself (cutting the cost drastically), and we’re going to tell you how to do just that!

Once you’ve made your own coconut flour, here are some notes to keep in mind:

  • Because coconut flour is extremely absorbent, you can not substitute 1:1
  • 1 cup shredded coconut will make 1/2 cup coconut flour

One cool bi-product of making your own coconut flour is coconut milk. See step #5 below. The liquid  strained off of the coconut pulp and that is left in the bowl is free coconut milk!


 

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups unsweetened coconut flakes
  • 6 cups water
  1. Add coconut and water to a blender or food processor. Let soak for 3 hours.
  2. Preheat oven to 170 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Blend or process coconut/water mixture on high until smooth, about 1-3 minutes.
  4. Place a cheese cloth over a mesh strainer, and place the strainer over the top of a medium bowl.
  5. Pour contents of blender/food processor into the strainer. Let sit for a couple of minutes to allow time to fully drain.
  6. Gather up the sides of the cheese cloth and squeeze around the coconut pulp, removing as much water as you can.
  7. Place coconut pulp on the baking sheet and, using a fork to break up clumps, spread out in an even layer.
  8. Bake for 4 hours (or longer if not completely dried out after 4).
  9. Carefully pick up parchment paper with coconut and pour into the bowl of a food processor. Blend until you have a fine powder, about 1 minute or so.
  10. Store in an airtight container.

Yields: 1 cup

Serving Size: 1/4 cup

Per serving: 21 g carbohydrates


Want to submit a recipe to us? Email us at hello@beyondtype2.org!

WRITTEN BY Brooke Wheeler, POSTED 11/22/22, UPDATED 11/22/22

Brooke lives in the heart of the Midwest where, along with her husband, they raise their 3 children (two boys and a girl). Her 10 year old son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was just 21 months old. His diagnosis, and the desire to make an imprint on the diabetic community, ultimately led to the creation of her recipe blog, Finger Prickin' Good (fingerprickingood.com), where she shares kid-approved and diabetic-friendly recipes.